Leadership Inspirations Activities

Team Minefield

Teams have to try to communicate with their team to collect as many cups as possible before time runs out


10-20 minutes

Team Stage

Storming, Norming, Performing

Type Of Activity

Experiential Activity


Blindfolds, Red And Clear Plastic Cups



In Team Minefield teams must try to communicate to each other to collect as many cups as possible before the time runs out. The catch? Only certain roles can talk. This activity helps groups to discover what elements are key to effective communication, the importance of roles in a group, and how individuals interact as team members.



  • Establish boundaries for your playing field and mark with rope, cones, or chalk.
  • Then, set up the minefield by randomly placing the cups inside the boundaries.
    • If you don’t have red and clear cups, use whatever objects you have on hand for this activity (shoes, frisbees, markers etc.).
  • Be creative in the way you set up the minefield so that it is challenging!


  • Break your group into smaller teams of five people or more and have them appoint one Caller and one Collector. Both will need to feel comfortable being blindfolded.
  • Blindfold the Caller and Collector before they can see the minefield. Have them wait with a leader somewhere where they can’t hear the others instructions.
  • Bring the remaining group members into the game area and assign each team a spot to stand outside the minefield.
  • Instruct the groups that they need to communicate to their Caller to direct their Collector to pick up as many clear cups as they can without touching any of the red cups in five minutes.
  • If at any time the Collector touches a red cup, the team will lose a cup.
  • Only the Caller and Collector may speak throughout the entire game. Groups will have to figure out a good way to communicate to the Caller so they can give instructions to the Collector.
  • Groups may not enter the minefield for any reason and cannot write anything down.
  • Tell the groups they have time strategize but as soon as the Caller and Collector enter the game area, their strategy time is over and they can no longer speak.
  • Bring the Caller and Collector in. Have the Callers face away from the minefield, with their back to the playing field, and take off their blindfold. At no time may the Caller turn around and face the minefield.
  • Place the Collectors anywhere and begin.
  • Keep time, they will have five minutes.
  • Observe the interaction of the group.


  • If you choose, you can give the groups the opportunity to use what they learned from the first round and a have a second round.
  • Also see Minefield and Silent Opera!


  • What was the goal of this activity?
  • Did your group do well? What could have improved?
  • How did your group make decisions? Was it effective or ineffective?
  • How did your group manage conflict that arose?
So What?


  • Who are you currently accountable for as an individual and a group? Who holds you accountable?
  • What is effective accountability? Are our methods as a group effective?
  • What role do you play in your own accountability and the group accountability?


  • Are we the only ones that define our purpose? What or who influences our purpose?
  • How do we communicate our purpose to new members or people outside of our group?
  • Why is it important that we all understand the purpose of our group/activity/etc.?


  • Why is feedback important? What kind of feedback is important?
  • What does constructive/effective feedback look like?
  • How did positive/negative/or no feedback affect your success?
Now What?
  • What does this activity tell you about the strengths of your group? The areas for improvement?
  • What’s one commitment each person can make?
  • What are three lessons the group has learned that they can continue to work on?
  • How can we implement these lessons in our school/organization?
  • What can you do differently moving forward?