Leadership Inspirations Facilitator Content

Bonding and Getting to Know You Activities

To understand how to best utilize getting to know you and bonding activities to introduce groups and strengthen relationships

There are many different kinds of activities that we can use with our teams to achieve different results or outcomes. Specifically, getting to know you and bonding activities are, at their core, about relationship building. Getting to know you activities focus on the relationship as it forms and develops. Bonding activities are used as the relationship grows and evolves over time. Generally speaking, getting to know you activities are usually lower risk while bonding activities tend to be higher risk.

 

GETTING TO KNOW YOU ACTIVITIES

Getting to know you activities are helpful when your group is first coming together. They provide a space for each group member to introduce themselves and share a little with the group. They also create low risk interactions where group members can learn more about each other.

When relationships are still forming in the group, trust is low. The purpose of these activities is to have the members meet one another in a safe and low risk environment so that new connections can be formed. Additionally, the goal of these activities is to give each person the opportunity to share their own individual uniqueness with the group. Providing an environment for the group to meet each other is critical to building effective working relationships within the group.

These activities give the facilitator the same opportunity as the other group members. They get to meet all of the group members and see how they interact with each other. The facilitator can also use this time to get a feel for the general dynamic of the group and use this information to help the group achieve their desired outcomes.

Examples: Skittles Game, FlashGroup Profile

 

BONDING ACTIVITIES

Bonding activities are specifically designed for group members to further develop their relationships with each other. These activities usually involve individuals revealing more personal details about themselves to the group. These activities bring people closer together and allow them to connect with others that they might not have before.

The purpose of bonding activities is to develop bonds, deepen relationships, and strengthen trust. Strong relationships are important for a group to succeed, because the group is able to accomplish more together than alone. Your group will find it much harder to achieve success if they do not know each other because a lack of trust, respect, and understanding can undermine a group in the long run. Bonding activities give the group (and its individual members) the chance to connect in meaningful ways in order to be able to work better together.

For the facilitator, this means that using bonding activities can help to elevate your group to the next level. They are able to collaborate and achieve synergy instead of being disengaged or disconnected from one another. Be conscious of your group energy though, as bonding activities can be exhausting exercises for people.  Use intentionally and intermittently as they require your participants to share personal information about themselves, and this is not always easy! Plan them strategically along with your other content and activities for the best results with your group.

Examples: Bondfire BuddiesI Represent Conflict, Appreciation Taps

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